farmhouse

Locust Lawn Farm

The historic Locust Lawn Farm in Gardiner New York is a rare treasure filled with the furnishings, clothing and possessions of five generations of the prosperous Hasbrouck family. 

Annette Young (a Hasbrouck descendent and the last private owner of the Farm) ensured that the buildings and collections would be open to the public with her 1958 donation of the property and art collections.  Today, Locust Lawn is owned and operated by the Locust Grove Estate as a museum and nature preserve.

The Federal-style mansion, built in 1814 for Colonel Josiah Hasbrouck, was once the heart of a 1,000 acre gentleman’s farm.  Colonel Hasbrouck served in the Revolutionary War as part of the Ulster County Militia, and later as a United States Representative during the Jefferson and Monroe administrations, a time of great optimism and change in the new republic.  The home and farm he developed on his return to the Hudson Valley represent both the height of fashion and the Jeffersonian ideal of pride in the rural, agricultural tradition.

Josiah Hasbrouck was born to a prominent family in New Paltz, New York.  He grew up in the large stone house built by his grandfather Jacob in 1722, today a museum known as the Jean Hasbrouck House at Historic Huguenot Street.

In 1809, after his return from Washington, DC, he purchased the Terwilliger family’s farm and mills just a few miles south of New Paltz overlooking the Plattekill Creek and five years later began to build the present mansion just steps away from the Terwilliger farmhouse. 

The new house featured a grand façade based on a design by Asher Benjamin, a notable architect and designer of the early 19th-century.  Downstairs, two parlors fill the front of the house, while a private family dining room, a school room and a kitchen complete the back.  On the second floor, there are four bedrooms, while the third floor is given over to storage and living space for servants.

After Josiah’s grandson (also named Josiah) died in the early 1880′s his heirs shuttered the house - in effect turning it into a time capsule of Hasbrouck family history.  The house, togeather with its original furniture and paintings, was donated to Historic Huguenot Street by Annette Innis Young, Josiah’s great-great granddaughter and the founder of the museum at the Locust Grove Estate, in 1958.  In 2010 the house was transferred to Locust Grove, reuniting two family properties for the first time in more than fifty years.

The house is currently undergoing restoration, but please see our calendar of events for the next open date.  For information on tours, please call 845-454-4500 x 211 or email  k.snodgrass@lgny.org

 

© 2011 Locust Grove Historic Estate. All Rights Reserved.